Interview: JoJo Has Nothing To Hide

Interview: JoJo Has Nothing To Hide

JoJo, Photo by Mat Hayward/Getty Images, “There are things that just cannot be taken away from me,” says JoJo. “And that’s my history, my voice, my spirit.” , Over the years, that’s exactly what the pop star has reinforced, though her approach—always using her voice, her spirit—took a lot of strength and resilience. In an age in which seemingly everything is available at the tap of a finger, JoJo’s first two albums remained absent from the world, as if lost in a patch of quicksand in the music streaming universe. And while dedicated fans of the 28-year-old pop star’s 2004 debut, JoJo, and 2006 followup The High Road, certainly felt their absence, the voice behind them, unable to share her music with the world, felt that loss more deeply. , JoJo signed with record label BlackGround at the age of 12, after having already turned down contracts elsewhere at a younger age. The label was co-owned by Barry Hankerson, ex-husband of Gladys Knight and uncle of Aaliyah, whom he also managed at a point. Hankerson also managed R Kelly and Toni Braxton. The label’s output included records from Aaliyah and Braxton, super-producer Timbaland, and R&B singer Tank, among others. But all of those beloved records have been held away from any and every online streaming or purchase outlet. The reasons behind that decision remain unclear, despite many reports attempting to dig into the issue. Many of the artists behind those hostaged records have settled out of court, with confidentiality agreements involved. , After years with her records suppressed, JoJo and her team came to a settlement with BlackGround in 2014. A deal with Atlantic followed shortly thereafter, but the master licensing for the original recordings for her first two albums remained under BlackGround control. Instead of allowing her songs to remain locked away, JoJo decided to record new vocal takes to slightly altered production. Diehard fans finally able to hear those songs rejoiced, but no one’s spirit was as unfettered as JoJo’s.  , On the eve of Women’s History Month, JoJo spoke with the Recording Academy about her fight to control her own voice, the process of re-recording songs she first released as a young teenager, and the music that comes next., , Did you always have a sense that you would be an artist or a musician of some kind?, Always. I was such a creative child! I’m so thankful that my mom nurtured that in me and allowed me to be free and to express myself through various different kinds of art—visual, music, dance, and acting. She didn’t stifle that in any way. I always knew that I wanted to live a creative life, to not go a traditional route. And I always loved music more than anything. It made me feel so whole, so understood. And when I sang, I felt like I had found something that made me special, and I felt that from a really young age., What made you start writing? What was the cause of that urgency? , Even at six years old, I would just be inspired to try and put my own lyrics into melodies that already existed. I started writing at school. I was really lucky to have teachers who fostered my creativity and encouraged me to do extra assignments for creative writing and poetry. That writing turned into songs because I’d like to model what I was doing after songs that I really liked, whether they were Mariah Carey’s, Whitney Houston’s, or Aretha Franklin’s. I was a strangely precocious little girl; I would look at the advertisements in the back of the newspaper for auditions. Somehow I knew that’s how you got famous—you had to audition for things. So I was looking for auditions and saying, “Mom, can you take me to New York for this audition? They’re looking for kids who can sing and dance and I really want to do that!” I’m just lucky that I had a mom who listened and was willing to take me to those things., , It’s especially influential to have that maternal support in making that dream feel very realistic as well., There’s honestly no other way I could’ve been so successful so young. I had been offered record deals from the age of nine years old. It was just that precociousness, that old soul. Nothing about the industry, the music itself, or the expectations scared me, nothing. I was very excited by it all., How rapidly do you feel your perceptions of the industry changed as you got older?, The more experiences that you have with human beings, the more that you learn, whatever industry you’re in. Life is all about relationships. So the more you engage in various kinds of relationships, the more perspective you can take into the next situation. As I got older, I got a little bit more conscious of people. My consciousness evolved and I was less naive., At this point in your career, do you have a typical way that you like to work? Do you have your own studio, or a place in your home where you like to write, or are you needing to constantly adjust?, I do my best to create an environment wherever I am where I can be free, comfortable, and confident. I really like to live a life that’s open and to be inspired by conversations and experiences. Something interesting might happen at any moment, and I’ll jot it down. I have tons of notebooks, tons of notes in my phone, tons of voice notes with melody ideas. But over the years, I’ve really learned to love collaboration. I love getting with a co-writer or a producer, coming to the table with certain ideas or influences and seeing what they have as well. That’s really special and valuable to me, especially if we’re talking about an experience that we can both relate to. It’s cool to see different sides of the same coin and to be able to explore it a little bit. I love the humanness that connects us all. I just try to stay open and keep myself in the flow as much as I can, not being closed off, or afraid, or ashamed, or self-conscious. , “I feel like I’ve got my power back and I’m stepping into the fullness of myself.”, You’ve been through hell with your former label, which makes what you said about the importance of relationships so meaningful. I can only imagine that was such a life-changing experience., It was definitely frustrating to feel like my history was just being swept under the rug. I’ve been building this career since before I was 12 years old. I feel like I’ve got my power back and I’m stepping into the fullness of myself. I spent a lot of years feeling like there was nothing I could do, feeling unempowered. It was fulfilling to find a solution—taking action, going back into the studio, re-singing the songs, collaborating with producers to have them remix these tracks, and re-releasing my first two albums. It’s amazing to have my fans understand what that meant and what the time commitment was, and amazing to have them be received the way they were. It made me feel like it wasn’t in vain. It was crazy that it got to this point, but I like solutions, and instead of being overwhelmed by what I can’t do, I wanted to focus more on what I can do and move forward, because I’m tired of looking backwards., I wanted to take control of my narrative in a tangible way, and this enabled me to do that. I wanted to put this out before I put out any new music so I could really get in touch with that carefree spirit that I had when I first started recording my first album, before things got really difficult for me in my professional life and personal life. I found my voice again through this process. I’ve been having conversations with other friends who are also in their 20s, and it seems like there’s a similar theme going on: we’re all wanting to get in touch with that inner child and to remember how we felt before life got in the way of who we truly are: that fearlessness and that true inner essence. , Recreating any sort of magical artistic moment is so tricky. Did you just jump right into it?, I just put my head down and did it, and with each song I went back and I had vivid memories of being in the studio the first time. I didn’t try to recreate it exactly because I don’t sing today like the little girl that I was back then. The voice changed and has more body now than it did back then. I wanted to take where I am now and relate to the songs in a natural way. I really just tried not to psych myself out about it. I tried to be as true as possible. Sometimes it felt like I was covering another person’s songs. It was kind of trippy to remind myself that we’re one and the same, and to bridge that gap. This is really for my fans, because I saw that people were asking where they could hear my first two albums, and I didn’t want it to come across like I was holding them back, or any weirdness like that. I just wanted to feel in control again., And as a woman in the music industry—or sadly any industry—you must have felt countless pains. But it’s inspiring and energizing that you were able to reclaim that music. How much of your strength was attached to that identity of being a woman in the music industry?, So much! I really needed to go through this in order to get some strength back and to feel like I’m firmly standing on solid ground. There are things that just cannot be taken away from me … and that’s my history, my voice, my spirit. In any industry where there’s money involved, and ego, I think that it can get very convoluted and challenging. I wanted to remember why I love this, and it’s because of how music makes me feel, how I can connect with as many people as possible. It would have been really hard for me to move forward because my spirit was broken through the process of feeling like I was losing my identity., “I wanted to remember why I love this, and it’s because of how music makes me feel, how I can connect with as many people as possible.”, Where did you mine the courage from to achieve that? , Well, I certainly don’t think about it as being courageous. I just refused to give up. I wanted to choose to see obstacles as opportunities—and that’s what my team and I have done for the past 10 years. Now that I’m free, making a new album, and working on a joint venture with Warner Bros., I’m more empowered and excited than ever. It’s constantly checking your mindset, and saying, “Do I want to be depressed about this, or do I want to find a better way to perceive my circumstances?” We have to check ourselves and ask those questions every day, because we’re more in control than we think we are. That’s what I needed to come to terms with. There were certainly moments where I was in a dark headspace, but that’s why you can’t do it alone. My fans’ support, the way that we are engaged with each other, is invaluable to me. And I wouldn’t have continued on in the way that I have if it weren’t for them., ,
Were there certain things about the process that you were surprised to learn, things that you wish someone would have told you when you were younger?, When I signed my first record deal, I was 12 years old, and my mom read a book called All You Need to Know About the Music Business. I think she learned a lot of valuable stuff in there, but there were also things that were not included in that book. I know that we trusted the people that I was signing business contracts with, and we trusted that they had my best interests at heart and that we were truly like a family. It’s important to separate business from family and friends and knowing that you can’t trust what somebody says—you need to get it in writing. We didn’t understand that I didn’t own my voice. I had to get permission to do anything with my voice that could possibly make money for the record labels that I was signed to. They chose many times not to let me do certain things because they wanted more money. I wish we had known to go over contracts with a fine-tooth comb. But to be honest, I don’t live my life that way, where I’m looking backwards and thinking what if, thinking in retrospect, because it’s just not constructive. So I think about how I can move forward and have more ownership and more empowerment, and encourage young people to think about how much they want to give away of themselves and to be protected., You’re working on new music, pushing forward, focusing on who you are, who you can be. What does that music look like? , It’s really eye-opening to dive deeply into myself and connect with myself in a way that I really never have. I’m stepping out of my comfort zone, sonically, even in the way that I’m singing. I just want to continue to grow. I feel like if I’m not growing I’m dying. That’s what’s exciting me right now. I have nothing to hide. I want to tell all my stories so that I don’t feel ashamed of anything. I’ve had a lot of experiences as a woman—some good, some not so good. I want to control that narrative because I think a lot of times as women we feel ashamed for things that we’ve done, and instead of feeling that, I want to connect with others because I think there’s strength in being vulnerable. And I want to find that., Is there something creative that you haven’t done yet that you’d still like to do? , I’m really interested in directing. I would really like to start shadowing directors and getting more involved in that. I’m really inspired by how a lot of artists are being hands-on in that way and have been for a while. I just bought a place in L.A., and I’m really interested in the curation of making that a home and how developing a personal style and an aesthetic is something that can carry you through different areas of your life. , Interview: Maren Morris Cooks Up New Flavors On Girl, Protoje, Protoje sounds urgent on A Matter of Time—fitting, of course, as the Jamaican star’s fourth album captures an artist carving a new space within the genre’s most persuasive tools: energy and elation.  The album honors the genre’s deep-rooted traditions, but bursts forth into bold, bright territory, infusing pummeling hip-hop beats, sheets of orchestral jazz, and dancehall claps into transcendent party grooves., Protoje’s intense connection to his country’s music comes in part from family, as the son of Calypso king Mike Ollivierre and chart-topping Jamaican vocalist Lorna Bennett. Just as important, though, is the way the music has brought Jamaica to the rest of the world: Protoje spent 2018 on the road, sharing reggae with festival crowds like Reading & Leeds and opening for Lauryn Hill in the United States., , But he isn’t an artist content to rest on his laurels—nor those of reggae as a genre. “I can evolve, and I leave myself free to do so,” he says, low-slung yet resolute. Whether traditions in fashion or music, the 37-year-old artist finds comfort and strength in constantly pushing the envelope., Protoje spoke with the Recording Academy about his first GRAMMY nomination for Best Reggae Album, his hope for a conversation with Jay-Z, and how proud he is to help make reggae a bigger part of the world conversation., , What a way to start the year! This is your fourth record, and your first GRAMMY nomination for Best Reggae Album. Did you see awards as a goal when you first started out in your career? , Let me tell you, I thought that my third album, Ancient Future, I thought that would have been nominated because it was groundbreaking when it came out in terms of modern reggae music. Winning a GRAMMY was definitely a goal when I started out. It’s in the back of your mind always, you know, maybe one day I’ll get that GRAMMY award, I’ll be nominated. So I guess I thought about it but I was not obsessing on it. So much has happened since Ancient Future. It was very influential. When it came out we had the biggest song in reggae of like this decade. When I didn’t get nominated, I took my mind off the GRAMMYs. I didn’t expect to get nominated on my fourth because I thought the third was the sure thing. That’s how it goes sometimes. It just works out that way. I was delighted when I heard that this [A Matter of Time] was nominated. Things happen and when it’s your time. You don’t have to worry about anything. Take your time and see what happens., That’s an amazing way to see things, and especially fitting considering the album is called A Matter of Time. What was that instant feeling when you first heard about the nomination? How did you react?, My mom called and told me. We’ve been together a lot in my career, making progress. I just felt that my team, everybody was excited, and everybody works so hard for me. So it’s great to let them get that vibe and feel proud about it. I just know that I appreciate my family a lot and how they have supported me. Not every family is supportive, you know; not every parent is supportive, and I’m grateful for the ones I have, and I’m happy to make them proud. In the Jamaican music scene, there’s a lot of people who are supportive of each other. Everybody tries to support and help each other. I really like where it’s heading., RELATED: Ashley McBryde On Self-Acceptance & Why There’s Room For Everyone In Country Music, Beyond the feeling of the nomination, how are you feeling about attending the GRAMMY Awards? Do you have any idea what you’re going to feel as the awards start getting given out?, For me, it’s chill just to be there. I’m a very low-key, chill person. I’m not going to be overwhelmed or too excited. I’m not going to have too many expectations. I’ll be there with some of my friends, the people on my team, and my family. I’m looking forward to seeing things I’ve never seen before—just seeing how things are done at this level. It’s all just a learning experience for me., Where did you get that low-key chill from? Is it from watching your parents in the industry? , When I was seven years old, I didn’t want a birthday party. It’s just my personality. I never wanted a party, I never wanted excitement. I didn’t want to blow the candles out on the cake. I just wanted to chill out and be cool. I’ve just never been this excitable type of person. I’m just very grateful, you know? I just experience things and express myself differently. So I’m happy of course, but I don’t feel any, “Oh my God, I’m going to the GRAMMYs” kind of thing. It’s cool to be there and I’m just grateful to have been invited. I won’t be asking everybody for selfies or anything like that. That said, I’d love to have a conversation with Jay-Z. I don’t think he’ll be there this year, but I would love to have a conversation., When was the moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician, when you knew that this is the industry you wanted to pursue?, I was always obsessed with music, as early as I can remember. I think when I was about 13 or 14 years old. I first said maybe I could do this as a job, maybe I could do this so I don’t have to work. I just loved being able to express myself, to spend time with myself, just thinking about ideas and writing. I didn’t need company. It would just get my mind flowing. That was the main thing before anything else, just something to do with my time and not feel agitated, bored, or uninspired., Speaking of being inspired, you recorded this album at the Tuff Gong Studios. Did knowing its legacy and its impact have any effect on your process?, That’s interesting. There’s so much history, and it’s just a huge room. It’s very spacious. It left me time to be alone. It’s not one of the most popular studios in Jamaica today, it’s not where the industry goes. It’s really private, I get to take my time, and that to me has an impact on how the music comes out. It’s not rushed and not frantic., , While it’s clear that your latest record honors the traditions of reggae music, it’s also perhaps your most experimental work to date, blending genres and influences—a fusion. When you set out to record the album, did you have a specific goal or outline in mind?, I wanted to do things musically to push the genre further forward, to update it. Every genre of music grows and evolves, so reggae music should be no less evolved. I like to be at the forefront of change with my producer Winta James. He to me is one of the most innovative guys making music. So naturally it’s going to sound innovative. We could have easily made another Ancient Future again. But I wanted to try to do things differently and move the thing forward. I don’t worry about genres feeling too sacred. I have a commitment to myself and to those that listen to my music—or even those that don’t. My job is to make the music, to make what I like and feels good to me, and then live with whatever happens after that. I don’t feel pressure about the songs that I’m making., It’s just making the record the best way you can, taking the songs that are in your head and putting them down on record. That’s it. It’s not like I said, “Let me find a way to be different.” We listened to certain types of music, we wanted to try new stuff, and incorporate influences from everything that we do. My mind naturally works like that, and if I do something, I don’t want to spend the next two years doing the same thing all over again., Your 2018 tour spanned the world and featured so many thrilling accomplishments—Reading and Leeds, opening for Lauryn Hill. And now 2019 keeps that tour going into new continents and new opportunities. What was it like to bring your music to so many different audiences?, Music has given me everything in my life—where I live, what I drive, what I eat. It has provided everything for me and my family. It’s amazing to travel the world through music. To get to tour, to see people’s reaction first-hand to the songs that you sing in your house, it’s very humbling. I’m just very grateful, and again I must say that I am grateful to be able to be living my dream., That said, performing in Jamaica is very important. Those are always my favorite shows. There’s nothing like it. Those are the core fans. Those are the people who were there from the start. Those are people excited. You know, we get to invite the youth, people get to come out and celebrate the album. I know it’s going to be crazy. The presales are going like crazy. I just must say, I am really thankful that I get the support here and people actually come out and share their vibes. Jamaican crowds chill out more. They’re not as hyped as international audiences. They don’t come out to party as much. Jamaica is very much profiling. They come out dressed super well—you know, too cool for school. They don’t dance much., What does it mean to be a Jamaican artist? , Jamaica is a very blessed place, very influential in world music. I can guarantee there’s no comparison to any other place this small that has that much impact on world culture and world sound. For me, the music should be highlighted more, helped more, pushed more., RELATED: Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: Bring Me The Horizon’s Oli Sykes, Your performance style is incredible—and I use style intentionally, because you always look so fashionable. Can you tell me about your fashion philosophy and your clothing line?, [laughs] Thank you! I think presentation has always been a thing I’ve been key on. I just do what I feel, and have an eye for what I like. My girl always tells me that. Sometimes I want to wear a shirt with shoes and pants that don’t really go together. I always like to do what I feel comfortable with. I express myself through that. It all plays together, especially with this generation, which is so audio-visual., Then how can fashion connect specifically to music? I know one big part of your fashion sense is the reggae crown. , Yes! The reggae crown, specifically, is an expression of culture, another way to identify and to stand out, to carry on the tradition. It’s always been a thing in Jamaican fashion. You see it and you think of Bob Marley, Black Uhuru, and all of those guys. I grew up seeing it and thinking it was cool, and thought I was gonna rock it but do my thing a bit different now., What drives you to bring people to your label, In.Digg.Nation? And then to bring their art to the world?, I always wanted to be in charge of a label and managing artists. That was that my goal for the second decade of my career, which starts on January 1st, 2020. I’ve always wanted to set up a place where young artists that are coming up can have a space to go and be creative and have a way to get their music out. So I have two artists now, Lila Ike and Sevana. They’re doing well. I’m just trying to get that going, releasing more and producing more music. Just making the industry turn more reggae.,
, It’s @LilaIkeJa birthday yo.  She brings me so much joy in a me life.  Love u AK pic.twitter.com/ihRmP7ux9V, — A Matter Of Time.. Out Now (@Protoje) January 23, 2019, , What’s next in your trajectory? Do you have plans for another album coming soon? , More music, more music, more music! This year. I’m just building my studio now, so more music than usual. I won’t have to go and get studio time anymore. I don’t have to wait. If I want to record three songs tonight at 3:30, I can go and do it. So that’s going to make things happen a lot quicker., As time has passed, my perspective changes with it. I don’t have to stay to any understanding of what my path is. Times change, music changes, equipment changes, sound changes. You have to be able to move and adapt., Behind The Board: TOKiMONSTA On Creativity And Finding Common Ground Through Music, Kesha, Photo: Joseph Okpako/Getty Images, In a convergence of music and social progress, Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons has announced the third annual LOVELOUD festival, to take plce June 29 at Usana Amphitheatre in West Valley City, Utah. Kesha will headline this year’s festival, which will also feature performances by Martin Garrix, Tegan & Sara, Grouplove, K.Flay, PVRIS, Laura Jane Grace and Reynolds himself.,
, 6.29.19. One day. Dozens of amazing artists, including @KeshaRose, @MartinGarrix, and @DanReynolds. $1 million to support LGBTQ+ youth. Thousands of #LOVELOUD stories. Make one of them yours and ignite change at https://t.co/b3Tj5tytxo powered by @att #LOVELOUD2019 #TURNUPTHELOVE pic.twitter.com/cDr2BAwp3Z, — LOVELOUD (@LOVELOUDfest) March 13, 2019, , More than a music festival, LOVELOUD, “Seeks to progress the relevant and vital conversation about what it means to unconditionally love, understand, accept, and support LGBTQ+ youth in our communities,” according to a statement., The festival’s date of June 29 coincides with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, a significant day in the history of the LGBTQ+ community’s struggle for equality. Pride month is celebrated in June every year to commemorate the historic event. The LOVELOUD Foundation will again aim to raise more than $1,000,000 this year to benefit The Trevor Project, GLAAD, the Human Rights Campaign, Tegan and Sara Foundation, and Encircle, and other organizations focused on serving our LGBTQ+ youth., “LOVELOUD is back again this year and stronger than ever,” said Reynolds. “We are excited to celebrate our LGBTQ youth through music and spoken word. My hope is that they feel loved, accepted and perfect just the way they are. I invite all the political and religious leaders of Utah to join us as we show our LGBTQ youth that they are not just loved, but truly accepted and appreciated.”,
, I’m truly honored & humbled to be headlining @LOVELOUDfest this year.  I stand with my talented friend @DanReynolds & @ImagineDragons in this fight for equality. I hope to see you all come out for LOVELOUD this summer!Get your tickets this Friday at https://t.co/g2xRtdk0sz  pic.twitter.com/fSj0jJ6ZCB, — kesha (@KeshaRose) March 13, 2019, , Kesha, who is also an avid animal rights crusader, underscored the importance of equality and unity the festival champions, saying, “We need to make sure that all LGBTQ+ people feel accepted and supported and that families have the support that they need. It’s important to try to keep families together and having positive open minded conversations and, for me, to be a part of something that can continue building the bridge to create a safe space for everyone sounds like a beautiful opportunity.”, Additional performers and speakers will be announced in the coming weeks. Tickets for LOVELOUD Festival go on sale Friday, March 15 at 10 a.m. MST here., Beyonce & JAY-Z To Be Honored With GLAAD Vanguard Award, Zara Larsson, Photo: Jo Hale/Getty Images, Last November, MTV announced they would be reviving their Spring Break TV special come March 2019. Now, things are finally starting to heat up; on March 11 the network revealed details about the forthcoming week-long party., MTV Spring Break 2019 will bring the party to Cancún, Mex. one more time, with Swedish pop star Zara Larsson, GRAMMY-nominated rapper Tyga, brother rap team Rae Sremmurd, trap duo City Girls and their Quality Control label-mate, Atlanta rapper Lil Baby, all slated to perform.,
, @CityGirls_QC and @lilbaby4PF will be performing at #MTVSpringBreak.pic.twitter.com/ULNJEsL9UA, — MTV (@MTV) March 12, 2019, , The party will take place at the beachside Grand Oasis hotel from March 23–28, airing live on MTV and MTV.com. The event will be hosted by two of MTV’s boisterous personalities: “Wild N’ Out” co-host and MC Justina Valentine and Vinny Guadagnino of “Jersey Shore” fame., Guadagnino’s former “Jersey Shore” cast-mate is also slated to join the festivities, joining the lineup of musical guests as DJ Pauly D., There will also be special programming airing in conjunction with the week’s festivities, which involve the stars of two of the network’s current reality shows, “Siesta Key” and “The Challenge,” joining in on the Cancún festivities. The former cast of “Ex on the Beach” will reunite to “hit the sand to talk to spring breakers about love and romance.”,
, The first-ever MTV Spring Break took place in 1986 in Daytona Beach, Fla., featuring lots of neon and GRAMMY winners the Beastie Boys as musical guests. The network continued the program for years as its popularity grew, featuring guests over the years that included GRAMMY winners Usher, Lil Wayne and *NSYNC.  , The program aired live on the main channel until 2005, after which it moved to the MTVU until 2014, the last time the event took place. The reboot is part of MTV’s expansion in the music-centered live events space, along with their purchase of the annual Tahoe-based SnowGlobe Music Festival in 2018., Spring Break 2019 will be airing live on MTV and MTV.com from March 23 to 28. Or if you have your sights set on challenging Pauly D in an arm wrestling match, visit StudentCity’s site, MTV’s longtime Spring Break partner, for more info., Ace of Base’s “The Sign” Turns 25: How America Fell Back In Love With Swedish Pop, BTS, Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images, On March 13, “Saturday Night Live” revealed via Twitter that K-pop giants BTS will be the musical guest on April 13, with Emma Stone hosting. The timing is advantageous; their next album, Map Of The Soul: Persona, will be released the day before, on April 12., , , *casually leaves this here* pic.twitter.com/OMqDpKQlbD, On May 4, the 61st GRAMMY nominees’ Love Yourself: Speak Yourself Tour starts with the first of two nights at the Rose Bowl, followed by two at Chicago’s Soldier Field beginning May 11 and then three nights at New Jersey’s MetLife Stadium starting May 18. In June they’re playing London’s Wembley Stadium. To secure tickets, click here., BTS Asks Fans To Share Memories With A New Database, Titled “ARMYPEDIA”,
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